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Vatican Names New Bishop for Catholic Diocese That Oversees Queens and Brooklyn

Bishop Robert J. Brennan has been appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Brooklyn (Photo: Courtesy of the Diocese of Columbus)

Sept. 29, 2021 By Christian Murray

The Vatican announced today that it has appointed a new bishop to lead the Diocese of Brooklyn, a post that oversees Catholic churches and schools in the boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn.

Bishop Robert Brennan, who is currently serving as the Bishop of Columbus, Ohio, will be taking over the position from Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, who submitted his resignation in 2019 upon reaching 75 years of age—as required by Canon Law.

Bishop DiMarzio’s resignation was accepted today.

The change will go into effect on Tuesday, Nov. 30, when a mass of installation will be celebrated at the Cathedral of St. Joseph in Brooklyn.

Bishop Brennan, who was born in the Bronx and raised on Long Island, has served Catholics mainly in the Long Island region.

The 59-year-old completed his studies for the priesthood at the Seminary of Immaculate Conception in Huntington, Long Island, and was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Rockville Center in 1989. The Diocese of Rockville Center oversees the Catholic churches on Long Island.

His first parish assignment was at the Church of St. Patrick in Smithtown, Long Island. He served as Secretary to the Bishop for the Diocese of Rockville Center and was later ordained an Auxiliary Bishop for the Diocese. In January 2019, he was appointed the Bishop of Columbus.

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio (Photo: Courtesy of the Brooklyn Diocese)

“In the selection of Bishop Robert Brennan, the Holy Father has called upon a native New Yorker to return to lead the faithful of Brooklyn and Queens. On behalf of the Diocese of Brooklyn, I welcome Bishop Brennan who I have known for many years,” said Bishop DiMarzio, who has served the diocese as bishop for 18 years.

“This is a historic moment for the Diocese of Brooklyn which is a very active Diocese, and Bishop Brennan’s energy makes him a perfect choice. I ask for God’s blessings on this transition so that the work of God, in service to His people, can effectively continue for the more than 1.2 million Catholics throughout Brooklyn and Queens,” DiMarzio said.

Brennan said it would be difficult leaving the Diocese of Columbus but welcomed the new opportunity.

“I came to know amazing people in the Diocese of Columbus and there is a tremendous sadness in leaving them behind,” Bishop Brennan said. “As I prepare for a return to New York, I am ready and eager to embrace the people of Brooklyn and Queens as their pastor.”

 

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