You are reading

Tiffany Cabán Rocks The Establishment, Likely to Win Queens DA Race

Tiffany Caban Gives a Victory Speech at La Boom in Woodside Tuesday (QueensPost)

June 25, 2019 By Laura Hanrahan

Political newcomer Tiffany Cabán is on the verge of pulling off a stunning upset to win the Democratic nomination to be the next Queens District Attorney.

With 98.6 percent of the vote in, Cabán had generated 39.6 percent of the vote, about 1,100 votes more than Melinda Katz who pulled in about 38.3 percent of the ballots cast.

Cabán has yet to be officially named the winner, since there are about 3,500 absentee ballots that remain to be counted and Katz has not conceded.

But Cabán had no doubts that she was the winner.

“Tonight we won the Queens District Attorney’s Office,” Caban told her supporters at La Boom in Woodside.

She thanked her volunteers and said that the campaign had overcome many obstacles to win.

“When we started this thing, they said I was too young,” Cabán said. “They said I didn’t look like a district attorney. They said we couldn’t build a movements from the grass roots. They said we could not win–but we did it y’all.”

Cabán, a 31-year-old public defender who was the most progressive candidate in the race, gained momentum in recent weeks– following the endorsement of Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the New York Times. Three months ago she was unknown outside of left wing circles and Katz was the expected victor.

Her campaign message promising criminal reforms such as ending cash bail and the decriminalization of sex work resonated with progressive voters. She said she would not prosecute low level offenses such as turnstyle jumping and said that too many black and brown people were being unfairly incarcerated.

In the days leading up to the vote, Katz and Cabán emerged as the two front runners to fill the vacant seat left by longtime District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died last month.

The majority of endorsements for Cabán, a queer Latina and Astoria resident, came from outside of Queens including presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Inside Queens, the majority of endorsements went to Katz with Cabán picking up a handful of endorsements largely in western Queens where the progressive wave is strongest.

Cabán made a point to thank the Queens elected officials who backed her. When she mentioned Ocasio-Cortez, the crowd started chanting “AOC, AOC, AOC.”

Board of Elections

Katz, 53, who has served Queens for more than two decades as an Assembly Member, City Council Member and Borough President, has yet to concede and is not completely out of the race.

She spoke to her supporters in Forest Hills last night and reiterated the message that criminal justice reforms were needed. She was energized and showed no signs of bowing out of the race.

Katz’ platform, endorsed by a long list of centrist Queens Democrats and party loyalists, sought most of the same reforms as Cabán, such as the end of cash bail and the closing of Rikers Island. In fact, very little separated the candidates in terms of policy.

The race between Katz and Cabán was heated and at times personal. Earlier this month, Cabán released an ad that singled out Katz as a remnant of the Queens Democratic political machine, linking her to the real estate industry.

Just days before the election, Katz shot back, releasing an ad that called Cabán “dangerously wrong,” and stated that Cabán, who has worked as a public defender for six years, was “barely out of law school.”

But Cabán in her victory speech focused on the steps needed to fix the system and made clear that she was more than up for the job.

“The changes we are fighting for mean a fairer more equitable criminal justice system and that doesn’t come at the cost of safety.”

Katz on the Campaign trail Tuesday (Twitter)

 

email the author: [email protected]

7 Comments

Click for Comments 
Sam

I already lived through this brand of radical leftist policies under the Koch administration, who gave Dinkins 2,200+ murders per year. You win, AOC crowd, NYC lifers like me are giving up and moving out. Enjoy stepping over homeless people while buying your organic groceries and ordering maid services on you smartphone app. Yes, that sounds like a crotchety old guy, but seriously, all these people are only here because of the city Giuliani and to a lesser extent, Bloomberg built. None of you would have traded in your parents’ suburban home for the Dem-controlled city of the 1980s-early ’90s. And now, you are rewriting a history some of us lived through, pushing policies that led to 2,000+ mothers a year burying their children in this city. But, hey, you have no ties here, you can just move out the second things go slightly bad for you.

3
14
Reply
Mac

@Sam-Crime was rampant throughout the entire country throughout the 70’s 80’s & 90’s and not confined to NYC. I was born and raised here and present throughout the high crime years and can tell you Forest Hills and many other neighborhoods in Queens weren’t hit by the severe crime. Gentrification remedied the crime issue in the most hardly hit neighborhoods and to a lesser degree the policies of Gulliani.

9
1
Reply
Elephant

Katz voted to extend term limits 10 years ago because it suited her politically. I vowed never to vote for anyone who did that and I certainly couldn’t vote for her being the top cop.

8
1
Reply
Carl Marx

Two qualified candidates split the majority of the vote. This lead to a candidate who was touting her qualifications as being a queer Latina woman (mentioned here too) with no experience as a prosecutor and a short time working as a lawyer and public defender. One can only hope that the same democrats who voting for Katz and Lasak don’t make another mistake and will vote for whoever the Republican candidate is in the next election. If they don’t, you might as well call Queens the sanctuary county of New York City where the rights of prostitutes, illegal immigrants and the wrongly accused (no one is guilty in jail) will be prioritized over law abiding citizens. AOC is making her best efforts to ruin this borough.

35
72
Reply
Gardens Watcher

Count all the votes! 3,400 absentee votes are outstanding. Then we’ll know who won.

There’s over 700,000 registered Dems in Queens but less than 100,000 voted in this primary. That needs to change.

13
27
Reply
Gardens Watcher

Correction: NYT reporting there are over 6,300 uncounted paper ballots remaining, including 3,556 absentee ballots and 2,871 affidavits. Paper ballot count starts July 3.

Count ALL the votes y’all!

6
17
Reply
Gardens Watcher

Why downvotes for counting ALL the votes, especially with such a slim margin of victory? Elections are not final until all votes are certified and counted.

3
15
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Dozens of people, believed to be migrants, found living in cramped Queens cellar

Mayor Eric Adams confirmed that dozens of people, believed to be migrants, were found living illegally inside a commercial business in South Richmond Hill on Monday afternoon.

The cellar dwellers were discovered inside an illegal conversion of a 2-story, mixed-use building on Liberty Avenue in South Richmond Hill, according to the city’s Department of Buildings. DOB Inspectors were called to the scene at 132-03 Liberty Ave. by FDNY first responders after fire prevention inspectors acting on a tip found the people living in cramped and illegal conditions.

Southeast Queens man indicted for stealing more than $1.1M in pandemic loan fraud scheme: Feds

A Springfield Gardens man was arrested by federal agents on Thursday morning for allegedly stealing more than $1.1 million in a COVID-19 loan fraud scheme.

Terry Dor, 36, of 145th Road, was arraigned hours later in Brooklyn federal court on an eight-count indictment charging him with wire fraud, theft of public funds and money laundering in connection with a scheme to steal funds from the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program that provided emergency funding to distressed businesses during the pandemic.