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Rego Park: Demolition of Queens Blvd stores imminent, 8-story residential building to replace them

Dec. 8, 2016 By Domenick Rafter

A number of stores located on the corner of Queens Blvd and 65th Road are about to face the wrecking ball to make way for a eight-story mixed use building.

Bahar Corp., the developer, filed documents with the Department of Buildings on Nov. 30 seeking to install a side walk shed in preparation of bulldozing the structure. The company filed for a demolition permit in October.

The stores that once occupied the corner lot– at addresses that included 98-04, 98-06, 98-08, 98-10 and 98-12 Queens Blvd– lost their leases and have vacated the building.

The stores included Rego Park Cleaners, Gabriel clothing store, Vera Pharmacy, Sanji Indian Restaurant, Sato Japanese Restaurant and Masbia soup kitchen.

The new building will carry a 98-02 Queens Blvd. address. It will include 59 apartments, ranging from one-bedroom to three-bedroom, with balconies, 7,000-square feet of medical office space as well as retail on the street level and a parking garage for 59 cars.

The development was first announced in the summer of 2015 and construction was ewith a late 2017 completion date, but final permits were held up until last month.

A rendering of mixed-used building going up at 98-02 Queens Blvd.
Rendering Courtesy Peter Casini

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16 Comments

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Ravi

Beautiful!!!# keep building, i have plenty of relatives who want move here from mother land. Keep up this good progress, preety soon remind me of home here

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DO

No small stores? Local residents will have to walk many blocks and will not find another small pharmacy, or flowers. Just the gist of life, blown away.

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Bfryed

My neighborhood since a juvenile… New york city is over crowded and going to shit, get out while you can, im sure as hell happy that i did!

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Monica Roth

Only a disgusting racist would write something anonimouly. It is sad how a once classy neighborhood is now being inhabited by the low lives who feel that they are better than anyone else.

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Natasha Gubkin

It is a pity that such an ugly building violates the uniform style of buildings in this area.
This neighborhood area requires a store as former Woolworth, a supermarket, dry cleaners but not medical offices.

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Miriam Ferreira

What I’ve seen happen in this neighborhood is so sad. All the character, charm, absolutely being destroyed. I don’t have a problem with progress, but our elected officials and the DOB are not doing our neighborhood any justice. Just 2 blocks up from Queens Boulevard in the area of Austin Street and 65th Road, single family homes are routinely being demolished and 7-story structures are going up. All the “medical office” spaces remain empty – but putting in “medical offices” is the way they’re getting around zoning rules that don’t allow them to go above 6 stories in the area. Also, 7-story buildings with 4-6 parking spaces, a couple of which are reserved for the “commercial” spaces. Really shameful.

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Richard Delaney

This is one of the ugliest structures that my eyes have been witness to….it will be an eyesore and will only add to the congestion of the area.

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Richard Delaney

This is one of the ugliest structures that my eyes have been witness to….it will be an eyesore and will only add to the congestion of the area.

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Pam D

This area is already so overcrowded that this building is further ruining the charm, convenience and safety of the neighborhood.

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Melissa

Hideous. Why not build something that is more in line with the character of the neighborhood?

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JQ LLC

And the DOB continues with its 10 pounds of feces in a 5 pound bag method of distributing building permits and rezoning

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