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Queensboro FC Unveils Logo, As Club Prepares for 2022 Inaugural Season

Queensboro FC club logo

Oct. 7, 2020 By Christian Murray

The owners of Queens’ first ever professional soccer franchise have revealed the club’s logo.

The logo for the Queensboro FC aims to reflect the hallmark elements that define the borough, which consists of approximately 90 neighborhoods, 2 million residents and immigrants from more than 150 nations.

The centerpiece of the logo, according to the club, is a “Q” representing the name of the borough, which is surrounded by a shield that signifies the ideals of inclusion and protection.

The crown above the “Queensboro FC” logo represents the Queensboro Bridge and each of the 11 elements of the bridge corresponds to the number of players on the field.

The color palette of the crest is centered on the iconic purple color associated with the 7 train.

“We are making great progress every day on bringing this club to life,” said Queensboro FC co-founder David Villa, the retired Spanish international. “We have been approaching both the sporting side and the business side with world-class vision and execution.”

Queensboro FC was expected to debut in the United Soccer League Championship Division II professional league – a tier below Major League Soccer – in 2021. However, the club said in July that it is delaying the launch until March 2022 citing the impact of COVID-19 on the borough.

The club said its youth academy– an important component of the franchise– was disrupted due to the virus. Club officials said that they need to have a talent pipeline to the senior team fully established before they enter the league.

Queensboro FC said it also needs time to finalize stadium plans.

The club will consist of a first-team roster comprised of top international recruits, select academy players and local New York talent.

In July, the club hired Josep Gombau, a well-known coach from Spain, to manage the team and serve as the club’s sporting director.

“Queensboro FC’s logo unveiling is a major step in bringing people together across Queens, New York City and the world through their love of soccer—and to bring the championship mindset back to our city,” said Queensboro FC Co-founder Jonathan Krane, and CEO of KraneShares in a statement.

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