You are reading

Queens Neighborhoods Where Residents Work in the Restaurant, Retail and Tourist Industries Hit Hard: Study

Evan Wise (Unsplash)

May 19 2020, By Michael Dorgan

Many Queens neighborhoods consist of residents who work in the restaurant, tourist and retail industries– and those areas have taken a financial hit, according to a recent study.

The study, released by Center for an Urban Future, found that people who work in the four hardest-hit industries – restaurants, hotels, retail, and personal care services – predominantly reside in Queens, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Northern Manhattan.

Queens accounts for three of the top six city neighborhoods with the highest percentage of people working in these industries: 27 percent in Elmhurst/South Corona, 25 percent in North Corona/Jackson Heights and 24 percent in Whitestone/Flushing. The other three areas are Norwood and Highbridge in the Bronx and Sunset Park in Brooklyn – each with 24 percent.

The neighborhood of Woodside/Sunnyside ranked ninth, with 21 percent of residents working in those industries.

In comparison, less than 10 percent of the Upper East Side and Park Slope residents work in these four sectors.

The study found that while more than half of the jobs (51 percent) in the four hardest-hit industries are physically located in Manhattan, 81 percent of the workers in these sectors live in the outer boroughs.

The research also noted that Queens, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Northern Manhattan have a much higher share of non-white residents than the city average.

For instance in Elmhurst/South Corona and Jackson Heights/North Corona – the two neighborhoods with the greatest share of residents working in these sectors – 90 percent or more of the population is non-white and over 60 percent is foreign-born.

Overall, the study showed that there are 13 neighborhoods (out of 55 Census-defined city neighborhoods) where at least 20 percent of the working residents are employed in these industries.

Four are in the Bronx, four are in Queens, two are in Brooklyn, and two are in Northern Manhattan.

In 13 of these neighborhoods, at least 71 percent of the population is non-white.

Furthermore, in nine out of the 13 neighborhoods, at least 45 percent is foreign-born.

In contrast, the five neighborhoods with the lowest share of residents working in these four industries, at least 64 percent is white and no more than 25 percent foreign-born, according to the study.

Rendering: Center for an Urban Future

email the author: [email protected]
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

These Queens eateries are participating in the upcoming NYC Restaurant Week

NYC Restaurant Week is underway, so nix that skillet and bring family and friends to your favorite neighborhood spot, or get inspired and break bread somewhere new and different. During this special citywide culinary event, food-lovers will enjoy curated menus and prix-fixe prices that are easy on the wallet.

Bookings began on Jan. 17 and are available until Feb. 12, and you can reserve a table at 30 participating Queens restaurants, along with hundreds more across the five boroughs.

Lunar New Year ‘special celebration’ held at Queensborough Community College in Bayside

Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz joined Councilwomen Sandra Ung and Linda Lee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, for a special celebration in honor of the Lunar New Year at the Student Union Building at Queensborough Community College in Bayside.

Ung escaped the Cambodian genocide as a child, and her family emigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old. Now she represents Flushing with its enormous Asian American population. She said she is proud to see how many Lunar New Year celebrations she sees around the city compared to when she first arrived in Queens.