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Podcast: We Talk to Shaun Donovan, Candidate for New York City Mayor

Nov. 2, 2020 By Christian Murray

The presidential election may be front and center but the New York City mayoral race is beginning to take shape.

Today we talk to Shaun Donovan, one of the many candidates looking to be the next mayor.

He will be competing in the Democratic primary in June 2021 against Eric Adams, Scott Stringer, Maya Wiley, Kathryn Garcia and Dianne Morales—all of whom have announced that they are running. Many other candidates have announced or are likely to run.

Donovan comes to the race having never been in elected office. Instead, he has been a public servant for most of his career, working a number of high profile jobs such as being HUD Secretary under President Barack Obama and being the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development under Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Donovan touts his background of public service, and says that his deep knowledge of housing policy will prove vital in coming years. He said that when the moratorium on evictions ends many New Yorkers will face a crisis.

He says that New Yorkers are not looking for another politician but a problem solver with a history of public service.

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