You are reading

Payless Shoes, Which Has About 15 Stores in Queens, Shutting Down All U.S. Locations

Payless Shoes on 71st Avenue in Forest Hills (Google)

Feb. 16, 2019 By Christian Murray

Payless Shoes, which has more than 15 stores in Queens, is closing all its United States locations.

The company, known for its inexpensive footwear, announced Saturday that it would be liquidating all 2,100 of its American stores and winding down its online business.

Payless Shoes has an enormous presence in Queens, with stores in Astoria, Jackson Heights, Corona, Rego Park, Forest Hills, Jamaica and Ridgewood among its many locations.

The company told the New York Times that liquidation sales would start tomorrow, Feb. 17, and that many stores would be closed by the end of March, although some will remain open until May.

The Topeka, Kan.-based company joins a long list of retailers that have gone bust in recent times and in doing so changed the shopping districts in Queens.

Toys “R” Us, Radio Shack, Sports Authority, Aerosoles, Gymboree, National Wholesale Liquidators and Charlotte Russe are among the many retailers to have perished.

Petland Discounts announced in January that it was liquidating its stores, two weeks after the founder died.

Payless Shoes Locations in Central and Western Queens Plus Greenpoint

email the author: [email protected]

8 Comments

Click for Comments 
how do bikes work?

You’re suggesting bikes should pay for *emissions* inspection? That cyclists should pay tax on *gas* they don’t buy? Do you understand how bikes work?

Is there anywhere you can ride a bike that even has tolls?

Do bicycle parking meters exist anywhere? I’d love it if they did!

Pretty sure cyclists still have to pay taxes, which pay for the roads you drive on. Unlike your car, they don’t cause wear and tear and the damages that require.

4
2
Reply
Sara Ross

Drove to Tower Diner on Sunday, dropped friends off and went to park. Drove around for 25 minutes and would up parking near home – about 6 blocks away. Between the hydrants, oversized cars and the bike lanes, parking is non-existent. While driving around, I didn’t see even 1 person in the bike Lanes on either side of the Blvd. Bicyclists don’t pay NY for insurance, inspection, registration, gas tax, tolls or meters. These lanes have got to go.

3
41
Reply
how do bikes work?

You’re suggesting bikes should pay for *emissions* inspection? That cyclists should pay tax on *gas* they don’t buy? Do you understand how bikes work?

Is there anywhere you can ride a bike that even has tolls?

Do bicycle parking meters exist anywhere? I’d love it if they did!

Pretty sure cyclists still have to pay taxes, which pay for the roads you drive on. Unlike your car, they don’t cause wear and tear and the damages that require.

16
2
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Dozens of people, believed to be migrants, found living in cramped Queens cellar

Mayor Eric Adams confirmed that dozens of people, believed to be migrants, were found living illegally inside a commercial business in South Richmond Hill on Monday afternoon.

The cellar dwellers were discovered inside an illegal conversion of a 2-story, mixed-use building on Liberty Avenue in South Richmond Hill, according to the city’s Department of Buildings. DOB Inspectors were called to the scene at 132-03 Liberty Ave. by FDNY first responders after fire prevention inspectors acting on a tip found the people living in cramped and illegal conditions.

Southeast Queens man indicted for stealing more than $1.1M in pandemic loan fraud scheme: Feds

A Springfield Gardens man was arrested by federal agents on Thursday morning for allegedly stealing more than $1.1 million in a COVID-19 loan fraud scheme.

Terry Dor, 36, of 145th Road, was arraigned hours later in Brooklyn federal court on an eight-count indictment charging him with wire fraud, theft of public funds and money laundering in connection with a scheme to steal funds from the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program that provided emergency funding to distressed businesses during the pandemic.