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Pair Steal Man’s iPhone, AirPods and Fanny Pack in Rego Park; Escape on Subway

Oct. 12, 2021 By Allie Griffin

A pair of thieves stole a 27-year-old man’s iPhone, AirPods and fanny pack and then made an escape on the subway earlier this month in Rego Park.

Two men walked up the 27-year-old near the corner of 63rd Drive and Queens Boulevard at 3:15 a.m. on Oct. 1. One pushed a “hard object” against the victim’s body and demanded his belongings, police said.

They “forcibly” grabbed his iPhone, AirPods and fanny pack and then fled into the subway station at 63rd Drive – Rego Park, according to police.

The victim was not injured.

Anyone with information in regard to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the CrimeStoppers website at https://crimestoppers.nypdonline.org/ or on Twitter @NYPDTips.

Suspects (NYPD)

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Captain Obvious

If the NYPD and MTA PD went back to enforcing and criminalizing turnstile hopping then this would have been caught before the victim had to experience a robbery but apparently that would be racist so we can’t go after minor crimes to avoid greater ones. DOES NOT MAKE SENSE AT ALL!

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