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Noodle Shop to Open on Queens Boulevard in Forest Hills

Grandma Short Rib Noodles (Photo: Ren Wen Noodle Factory, Facebook)

May 17, 2018 By Tara Law

A restaurant serving American takes on Chinese noodle dishes will open in Forest Hills this summer. 

Ren Wen Noodle Factory, which opened it first location at 7 Great Neck Road in Flushing in March, will open a new noodle shop at 107-50 Queens Boulevard in late July or early August.

The restaurant will specialize in noodles mixed with American and traditional Chinese flavors. The location is near the exit of the Forest Hills- 71st Ave. (E/F/M/R) subway station.

The restaurant will be opened by C.S. Wong, 82, the founder of Wonton Foods— the largest noodle, fortune cookie and Asian food manufacturer in the U.S. Wonton Foods has over 400 employees today, but started out as a noodle shop in Chinatown in the early 1970s said manager Ryan Smith.  

The new restaurants reflect Wong’s roots as a noodle shop owner and as an immigrant from China. Each dish takes inspiration from different Chinese regions— such as fermented chili paste and fried garlic chili oil— but also incorporates ingredients that are familiar to Americans.

“We don’t want people to think it’s Chinese food— it’s very American inspired,” Smith said.

107-50 Queens Boulevard (Photo: Google Maps)

The restaurant will also serve a wide variety of noodles, including those invented by the chef. These include a “ten piece noodle”— 10 pieces of ramen fused together— and a “grandma noodle,” a ribbon-like noodle that is thicker in the middle. 

Smith said that the restaurant is still finalizing its menu, but it plans to incorporate many items from the Flushing restaurant, which serves noodle bowls with broth or sauce.

Customers who are perplexed by any of the ingredients are invited to ask their waiters, Smith said.

“We like for people to ask about the ingredients, and we encourage them to ask questions,” Smith said. “We want to educate people on the culture as well as give them something new to try.”

The Forest Hills restaurant will offer 70 seats and counter service. The restaurant plans to apply for a liquor license in the near future.

 

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14 Comments

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Sunny Lai

people if you don’t like it don’t patronize and also you can always move if you think the neighborhood is changing.

Reply
Susan

Don’t agree with the 5th Avenue comparison, but many, many, many years ago, Forest Hills had more of a SoHo type atmosphere — record stores (we had two), book shops (again, two), an apothecary type store that sold healing herbs, a small make-up boutique with higher end products and perfumes, Pinsky’s stationary, et al. Metropolitan Avenue had not less than five antique stores back in the day. The fact that these stores were forced out of business is in line with the problem many Mom and Pops have faced — astronomical rents. We morphed into a community of chain stores. It has nice to see somewhat of a resurrection these past few years. The Mom and Pop stores are making a comeback. Better restaurants than we’ve seen in years are finding their way back into Forest Hills. YES, many of these are reflecting the population itself. Here’s a news flash – roughly 30% of the population in Forest Hills identify their ethnicity as Asian. If that bothers you, than Forest Hills (or Queens in general, which is ~ 24% Asian), is probably not the borough for you. Conversely, this group is bringing money back into our neighborhood and stores which have remained empty for way to long are re-opening, bringing money back into FoHi. It’s doubtful that all these Noodle Shops will survive, but some will. I’ll also note that there were food establishments in Forest Hills in the not too distant past that were quick to high-tail it out of our neighborhood, even though they were packing them in here (Stone Cold Creamery couldn’t move to Atlas Park fast enough, once that opened, even though there were lines out the street on a summer night; Wafa, who claimed to be moving to the West Coast only to re-open in Brooklyn; Danny Brown’s where you had to book a month in advance couldn’t bother to re-open in Forest Hills after a rent dispute. Instead they re-opened as Carc on the upper east side). And of course, we lost our beloved Barnes & Noble due to a rent dispute, as well as two movie theaters. But look at what we’ve gained the past few years — Banter, Jack & Nellie’s, Keuka Kafe, Rove, Yasu Sushi, Station House, Bare Burger, Shake Shack. Cinemart Cinemas has reinvented themselves. On Metropolitan Avenue we’ve gained Nick’s Bistro and Tazzina. We now have a farmers market! So I get it if Asian food may not be your thing — but there are certainly oodles of other options and you should be thankful that there are few less For Rent signs.

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Art

Oh great. So now I have to move out to make room for more Chinese. The only place that sees their money is their mattresses. Don’t be blind. They don’t bring any value to FH

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Eneri

WTF how many more over priced Asian stores do we need this is the new Chinatown. The neighborhood has been changing at least for the last 10 years however in the last 2 years it has gone downhill excessive homeless people taunting and harassing the residence. Numerous business have either closed or left the neighborhood. The rents are still skyrocketing.. Its just not what it used to be this neighborhood was one of the best neighborhood in Queens now it’s gone to the dogs

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Joan

The ambiance, culture and dynamics of forest hills which was equivalent to a NYC 5th avenue shopping street is no longer a viable intetest anylonger. WHAT this area is now becoming is congested, dirty, cheap, vacant stores and an
Extension of Flushing and noone cares.

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Big B

I don’t think you’ve ever been to 5th Ave, if that’s what you think. And the biggest problem that FH has always had is an extreme lack of even decent restaurants. Thankfully, the last 2 years have brought a flurry of restaurants expanding from much cooler neighborhoods. It’s pretty embarrassing that FH has middle to upper class residents and no good upscale restaurants and FH has a large Asian population and until recently, no authentic Asian cuisine. Numero 28, Xin Taste, Tamashii, Ren Wen, and fast casual places like KissFish, Shake Shack, and even Paris Baguette have improved the the neighborhood and quality of life immensely.

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Ivan

NYC 5th Avenue has culture and dynamics?? I thought all it had were expensive shops and a constant influx of year-round tourists. INTERESTING! I’ll have to look that up.

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David

Joan, do you ever wonder why they’re vacant? Because they’re waiting for a business willing to pay the rent that’s being asked.

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Patricia Grant

Will this restaurant have other food besides noodles, like all types of meat not pork but chicken, beef,lamb,veal N fresh vegetables.

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