You are reading

City Council Axes Terms ‘Alien’ and ‘Illegal Immigrant’ on Official Documents

Council Member Francisco Moya at the virtual city council hearing (Twitter)

May 29, 2020 By Allie Griffin

The City Council voted to axe the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” from all official city documents, laws and rules Thursday.

The terms are offensive and discriminatory toward undocumented immigrants, said Elmhurst Council Member Francisco Moya, who introduced the bill in January.

The term to replace the phrases will now be “noncitizen.”

“No human being is illegal,” Moya said. “‘Illegal immigrant’ and ‘alien’ are dehumanizing and divisive and they don’t belong our city’s guiding documents.”

Council Speaker Corey Johnson praised the bill’s 46-4 vote. He said New York City is the first city to end the use of the terms in their official documents.

Four council members voted against the bill, including Glendale Council Member Robert Holden.

“It’s like the speech police is out again,” Holden told the New York Post. “Alien is a term used for someone who is from another area, another land. That’s a term used in Congress and in the government.”

email the author: [email protected]

2 Comments

Click for Comments 
Jasmine Perez

What a crock. If you are here illegally you are an ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT. Don’t like the term/name? Become a citizen. Very simple.

14
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

MTA providing shuttle from 7 train to traveling Vietnam War Memorial replica in Flushing Meadows Corona Park

Sep. 26, 2023 By Bill Parry

The MTA is working with the NYC Department of Veterans’ Affairs to provide shuttle bus service between the Mets-Willets Point 7 train station and Flushing Meadows Corona Park for all those wishing to visit the “The Wall that Heals,” a three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., that honors the more than three million Americans who served in the Armed Forces during the Vietnam conflict.