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City Council Axes Terms ‘Alien’ and ‘Illegal Immigrant’ on Official Documents

Council Member Francisco Moya at the virtual city council hearing (Twitter)

May 29, 2020 By Allie Griffin

The City Council voted to axe the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” from all official city documents, laws and rules Thursday.

The terms are offensive and discriminatory toward undocumented immigrants, said Elmhurst Council Member Francisco Moya, who introduced the bill in January.

The term to replace the phrases will now be “noncitizen.”

“No human being is illegal,” Moya said. “‘Illegal immigrant’ and ‘alien’ are dehumanizing and divisive and they don’t belong our city’s guiding documents.”

Council Speaker Corey Johnson praised the bill’s 46-4 vote. He said New York City is the first city to end the use of the terms in their official documents.

Four council members voted against the bill, including Glendale Council Member Robert Holden.

“It’s like the speech police is out again,” Holden told the New York Post. “Alien is a term used for someone who is from another area, another land. That’s a term used in Congress and in the government.”

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Jasmine Perez

What a crock. If you are here illegally you are an ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT. Don’t like the term/name? Become a citizen. Very simple.

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