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Bill to Create Citywide Residential Parking Permit System Introduced in City Council

Residential Street in Forest Hills (Google)

April 25, 2018 By Nathaly Pesantez

A new bill by a Manhattan Councilmember seeking to create a citywide residential parking permit system was introduced today.

The bill, put forth by Councilmember Ydanis Rodriguez (D-Washington Heights), calls for the city to implement residential parking zones with posted times of day and days of the week the system is in effect.

Furthermore, up to 80 percent of parking spaces in a given permit area must be reserved for paying permit holders, with the remaining spaces available for non-residents for up to 90 minutes.

The bill would not allow for residential parking permits on commercial streets.

Rodriguez said in a midday press conference today that the residential parking permit system can help address congestion and encourage mass transit use.

“By paying a small fee every year, those local residents will not have to compete with anybody else that comes from out of state, idling in the street,” Rodriguez said. “We will work to make sure those residents—and our mom and pop stores—will have an opportunity to find parking.”

Rodriguez added that several cities across the United States, including Boston, San Francisco, and Chicago, have already implemented a residential parking permit system.

Rodriguez’s bill is not the only one introduced that seeks a residential parking permit system in the city. A bill also put forth today by Councilmember Mark Levine (D-Morningside Heights) seeks to implement a residential parking permit system for all areas north of 60th Street in Manhattan.

Transportation Alternatives, the non-profit that vouches for a car-free transportation, supports Rodriguez’s bill.

“Making better use of curbside space besides free, unlimited long-term private car storage will dis-incentivize uneceessary driving and reduce congestion,” the group said on Twitter.

In a statement, Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Sunnyside), who is co-sponsoring the citywide bill, said he has long been a strong supporter of residential parking permits.

“Local parking should be for local residents, not for commuters on their way from Long Island to Manhattan,” Van Bramer said. “I look forward to working with the sponsors of this legislation to make sure it works for residents of Queens.”

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6 Comments

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Raymond Arroyo

the permits should be NYC specific only not residential specific. I should be able to park anywhere in NYC (of course maintaining all current parking laws). I don’t want to have to stress about finding parking in Kew Gardens because I live in Ozone Park and I want to visit a friend. Just penalize commuters who are coming from Long Island and Out of state, that’s it

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charles a castro

I said the same thing, what happens if I go visit a friend. Fcuk this BS, another way to tax us.

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James

This would be great for residential areas to guarantee parking near our homes. I would gladly pay for a permit to avoid the hours and gas wasted circling the streets to park. Problem is, people could end up ignoring the system and simply park in the street. Enforcing this would require staff to monitor vehicles for a sticker/plaque confirming their residence and (maybe) towing the car away or getting a ticket.

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FoHi Resident

Parking in Forest Hills has become a tremendous issue. People park here for days to weeks at a time on streets that do not have alternate side. Often you will find a commuter car parked taking up multiple spots or an out of state vehicle parked for weeks using our streets are a free parking lot while they travel or even abandoned derelict vehicles occupying spots. 112pct refuses to respond to these issues and concerns and rarely ever comes to chalk tires. 311 complaints are closed stating they are resolved meanwhile the residents still have these vehicles in front of their homes without ever seeing any 112pct officer arrive to remedy and or resolve the issue.

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CJW

Who in their right mind would leave their car parked on a city street while they’re off traveling unless he lives in the neighborhood…More likely they’re peopl whose cars are registered in other states.

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TC

Same in Corona. 311 system is an insult to those of us who submit valid issues. Nypd only interested in booting vehicles parked in corrupt “Temporary Construction No Parking Anytime” zones.

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