You are reading

15-Year-Old Scooter Driver in Critical Condition After Striking MTA Bus in Ridgewood Tuesday

A 15-year-old boy is in critical condition after he struck an MTA bus while riding a scooter at the intersection of Seneca Avenue and Gates Avenue in Ridgewood Tuesday (Photo via Google Maps)

April 6, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

A 15-year-old boy is in critical condition after he struck an MTA bus while riding a scooter in Ridgewood Tuesday.

The teen was on a scooter traveling northbound along Seneca Avenue when he collided with the bus at the intersection of Seneca Avenue and Gates Avenue at around 1:10 p.m., according to police.

The 15-year-old was thrown off his gas-powered vehicle in the crash and hit the ground. He was transported to Brookdale Hospital with head injuries and is in critical condition, cops said.

The MTA bus, police said, was traveling with the light southbound on Gates Avenue when the scooter slammed into it. The MTA bus driver remained at the scene until police arrived.

The investigation remains ongoing by the NYPD Highway District’s Collision Investigation Squad. There have been no arrests.

The minimum legal age requirement to operate a motorcycle in New York is 16-years-old. The victim was riding an unregistered Jiangsu Baodiao scooter.

email the author: [email protected]

One Comment

Click for Comments 
Captain Obvious

This will continue indefinitely unless the DOT and the NYPD work together with Politicians to have these dangerous devices removed from the streets. Between the all the reckless delivery people and the teens it is nothing more than a recipe for disaster and fatality.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

NYC Test Scores Drop in Math, Increase in Reading

Nearly half of New York City’s third through eighth graders passed their state reading tests last school year, while about 38% passed math, according to scores released by city officials Wednesday.

The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic upended in-person schooling and left many children grappling with isolation and grief. Though schools gave students other city-mandated assessments last year, officials have refused to publicly release the results.